Flashback: One Hot Minute Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. II

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ One Hot Minute
Released: September 12, 1995
Genre: Alternative/Rock
Label: Warner Bros. Records
Executive Producer: Rick Rubin

Filling the huge creative void left by guitarist John Frusciante due to his departure would be no easy feat for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. After unsuccessful attempts to recrut a replacement guitarist, Chad Smith eventually suggested Dave Navarro of Jane’s Addiction, the alternative rock band who had recently broken up in 1991. Dave had a very different, more metal-driven and psycadelic style of guitar playing than that of the eccentric John, but despite the differences, the new-look Red Hot Chili Peppers began writing their followup to the highly successful Blood Sugar Sex Magik album. After some time, the writing process became difficult as Dave had trouble adjusting to the band’s sound and unique writing sessions which simply consisted of jamming, and eventually felt alienated by the rest of the band. After much termoil in the writing process, One Hot Minute was eventually released, and was the recieved with generally negative and critical reviews. The album was criticized for lack of chemistry within the band and an inconsistant theme. The album did follow a darker path than any of its predecessors and delved into a more emotional sound. Despite the negative reviews, the album was moderately successful commercially, reaching #4 on the Billboard Top 200 charts while single “My Friends” reached #1 on the rock charts and “Aeroplane” reached #11 on the UK Top 40.

1. Warped: The track opens with very smooth, trippy, guitar riffs and kicks into a hard moving bassline which drives the rest of the song. The verses from Anthony talk about drug addiction but vocally, Anthony is mostly synthesized the verses arent put together well, although the chorus is more listenable.
(7/10)

2. Aeroplane: One of the more popular songs on the record, the song features psycadelic chorus vocals from Anthony and some wailing guitar riffs from Dave. But the best feature of the track is the slap bass lines from Flea.
(8/10)

3. Deep Kick: Very peaceful and psycadelic instrumentals open the track coupled with a poetic spoken verse from Anthony. It eventually kicks into a triumphant guitar line and deep basslines but features very cheezy vocals.
(5/10)

4. My Friends: A part acoustic track that is by far the best on the record. The song isnt well known but is a beauty. Vocally Anthony is at his best with nice falsetos and very meaningful lyrics.
(10/10)

5. Coffee Shop: A song driven by Flea’s moving and grovey bassline. It is another synthesized track vocally but the verses are mostly just wailing and is hard to listen to.
(5/10)

6. Pea: A solo track from Flea, the song is just Flea jamming with a simple slap bassline and trying to sing along. I have no idea why this made the cut of the album.
(2/10)

7. One Big Mob: The track opens with chants along with a moving bassline and just when you think the chants are over the verses are chants from Anthony and the chorus is more chants. When the track slows down the vocals are heavily synthesized and the guitar line sounds like a baby crying and is just scratching guitar noise.
(2/10)

8. Walkabout: A grovey track with a nice bassline and a nice wailing guitar line and solo from Dave. The vocals are basically just spoken word and overall not very tasteful.
(6/10)

9. Tearjerker: Another underrated standout ballad on the record. The rippling and peaceful guitar lines are bliss. Anthony has some of the best vocals on the record on this track. He also sings about the death of Kurt Cobain in a tributive way.
(8/10)

10. One Hot Minute: The song is a blend of weak wailing guitar lines, a moving bassline and sub-par vocals. Some parts of the song have nice attributes but the song as a whole is a skip.
(4/10)

11. Falling Into Grace: Another grovey track with average vocals and an overall weak and odd-sounding guitar line. The wailing guitar sounds inbetween verses sound like noise more than music. The solo interestingly has an indian quality noteably like the psycadelic Beatles song “Within Without You”.
(5/10)

12. Shallow Be Thy Game: The bassline is a standout on the track but the overall intrumentals sound so generic but Anthony’s vocals are nice in this track especially the chorus.
(5/10)

13. Transcending: A really nice slap bassline opens the track and is complimented well with Dave’s guitar riffs. A feel good track with standout vocals and a nice vibe. It would be a great track if it didnt switch into a bizzare series of noises. All of a sudden halfway through a good track flows into an odd and horrible song. It symbolizes the album ina way. Just when you think the album is a good one it turns on you and becomes odd.
(6/10)

Best:
Warped
My Friends
Tearjerker

Worst:
Pea
One Big Mob
One Hot Minute

Final LP Rating: 5.5/10
The album severely lacked in depth, but despite the weak overall album, there are some tracks here that are worth listening to and can be considered classics. Dave Navarro wasn’t meant to be a Red Hot Chili Pepper, but he did his best. This album gerally gets very mixed reviews; some think the album is a weak attempt for a followup to the highly sucessful Blood Sugar Sex Magik album, but others think it connects with a deep emotion while also exploring a darker side to the Chili Peppers’ sound.

Flashback: Blood Sugar Sex Magik Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. II

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Blood Sugar Sex Magik
Released: September 24, 1991
Genre: Alternative/Rock
Label: Warner Bros. Records
Excecutive Producer: Rick Rubin

Peaking at #3 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, the Blood Sugar Sex Magik album achieved more success than the Red Hot Chili Peppers would have ever thought a few years earlier. The lead single “Under The Bridge” peaked at #2 on the Billboard charts, making it the most successful album in the band’s career to that point. Due to the worldwide success of the album, a world tour was scheduled, but during the tour, John Frusciante, who prefered the underground scene at the time, couldn’t cope with the newfound fame of himself and the Red Hot Chili Peppers and shockingly after a show in Japan in 1992, quit the band. From there, things got worse for John as he ventured on a dark path of drugs and lost contact with most of his bandmates. Due to John’s departure, guitarist Arik Marshall (formally of Marshall’s Law) completed the world tour with the band, but was eventually fired at the end of the tour. Blood Sugar Sex Magik was by far the most influential album the Red Hot Chili Peppers have made. Give credit to producer Rick Rubin where it is due. Upon arrival to the recording sessions in the private mansion in L.A., he completely changed the Chili Peppers’ sound and influenced the band’s material for years to come. The Blood Sugar Sex Magik sessions are considered a turning point in the band’s career and is the point of separation between the band’s two genres, funk and alternative rock. The pre-Blood Sugar Sex Magik era for the Peppers was full of funk and heavy metal flavor with releases such as Freaky Styley and Mother’s Milk which recieved minimal success. This all changed however with the release of Blood Sugar Sex Magik.

1. Power of Equality: Great fast paced opening track. The guitar riff immediately grabs you and later in the song Flea’s dominating bass solo is a highlight. The eerie guitar solo in the end just positively adds to the song.
(8/10)

2. If You Have To Ask: Although there is something very catchy about this song, it is a very weak track. It consists of bad instrumentals rapped over by Kiedis. The chorus is a wail of falseto which simply doesn’t work.
(3/10)

3. Breaking The Girl: A Chili Peppers classic, the song is an acoustic track which has great instrumentals. The vocals in this track are solid, and has a feel-good vibe. Great percussion solo at the end.
(8/10)

4. Funky Monks: Not a bad track, with groovey bass and guitar lines but rather weak vocally, although the chorus has a nice falseto. Another instrumentally strong track.
(5/10)

5. Suck My Kiss: A strong point on the record, this track has a quality moving bassline from Flea with nice complimenting guitar riffs from John. Nice vocals and raps from Anthony who flips back and forth from his old and new style of vocals.
(7/10)

6. I Could Have Lied: The darkest song on the record, this is a slow moving ballad and a type of track the Red Hot Chili Peppers hadnt attempted before. Using a tasteful acoustic guitar line, along with euphoric electric guitar riffs later in the track, plus great vocals, the track is an absolute gem.
(9/10)

7. Mellowship Slinky in B Major: Instrumentals in this track are some of the best on the entire record. Overall the song is very lengthy with synthesized vocals but quality instrumental solos. When Anthony’s voice appears unsythesized the traxk shines but the synthesizing takes away from the vocals.
(7/10)

8. The Rightous and the Wicked: An overall slow and weak track that goes nowhere but features nice guitar instrumentals from John.
(4/10)

9. Give It Away: Arguably the best song on the record, the track has a great groovey feel coupled with nice raps from Anthony. The guitar riffs are pure quality making this track one of the top Chili Pepper tracks ever. At the time of release the popular music world had never heard a track of its kind which points to its originality.
(10/10)

10. Blood Sugar Sex Magik: The title track is yet another solid track instrumentally. The drum line from Chad dominates this song and John shines over the beat with really nice riffs. The vocals from Anthony are deep and eerie.
(7/10)

11. Under The Bridge: What can i say about the greatest and most successful Red Hot Chili Peppers song? Well it is the greatest Chili Peppers song for a reason. Quality vocals and very meaningful and soulful lyrics contribute along with beautiful guitar riffs to make a simply great and timeless song.
(10/10)

12. Naked In The Rain: A funk inspired track with some nice grooves. Flea dominates this song with his trademark slap-bass style.
(6/10)

13. Apache Rose Peacock: A very chill and laidback song with some nice vocals mixed in with backround guitar lines which have a funky groove to them. Nice track.
(8/10)

14. The Greeting Song: Fast paced song with a heavy bassline and an overpowering guitar line. It doesnt really go anywhere but is a solid track.
(5/10)

15. My Lovely Man: Running deep guitar line provides stabilization for Anthony’s great verses and the groovy electric guitar riffs in the chorus are just bliss. Great song.
(8/10)

16. Sir Psyco Sexy: Well excecuted scratchy guitar lines and a deep womp-type bass line are just a part of this great song as Anthony tells a sex story. Chorus takes away from the song but is forgettable. The two minute guitar solo from John at the end of the track is simply pure euphoria.
(8/10)

17. They’re Red Hot: Could have been left off the album as the ending from the previous track could have been a great ending to a overall great album. This is a very fast paced short song that basically says they are “red hot”.
(2/10)

Best:
Under the Bridge
Give It Away
I Could Have Lied

Worst:
They’re Red Hot
The Rightous and the Wicked
If You Have To Ask

Final LP Rating: 7.5/10
This album was critical for the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ success. The Blood Sugar Sex Magik sessions produced the Chili Peppers first ballads such as smash hit “Under the Bridge” and “I Could Have Lied”, which a couple years before wouldnt have flied well with the hard funk style Chili Peppers had at the time. Credit goes to Rick Rubin who encouraged the new and different sound to emerge and influenced the many albums to come.

Flashback: Mother’s Milk Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. II

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Mother’s Milk
Released: August 16, 1989
Genre: Punk/Rock/Metal
Label: EMI
Executive Producer: Michael Beinhorn

Due to guitarist Hillel Slovak’s death, and the departure of drummer Jack Irons, the future of the Red Hot Chili Peppers was in serious doubt. Ultimately after some thought, the decision was made by Anthony Kiedis and Flea to keep making music. Following their decision, Flea and Anthony hired former Parliment-Funkadelic guitarist, DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight to replace Hillel Slovak, and D.H. Peligro of the Dead Kennedys to replace Jack Irons on the drums. However, despite the fact that some drum parts of tracks on the album were already written by Peligro, the two new members were fired months later due to lack of chemistry. Following the firings, Flea turned to a friend of his, John Frusciante, who was not only a skilled guitar player, but also an avid Red Hot Chili Peppers fan. He immediately accepted the invitation to join the band, although the drummer slot had yet to be filled. The void was filled through auditions, and it wasn’t until the final auditionee, Chad Smith, when the Red Hot Chili Peppers found their talanted and longtime drummer. Mother’s Milk was by far the most successful Chili Peppers album to that point, and with it brought a new style and sound the the band welcomed.

1. Good Time Boys: A groovey track with a heavy bassline, great guitar rifds and some nice vocals. The chorus is a little dry but it works.
(7/10)

2. Higher Ground: The lead single off the album and a Stevie Wonder cover, this track shot the Chili Peppers into fame. The cover gives the original some serious competion as the band’s style compiments the track well. Flea’s heavy bass line and Frusciante’s guitar riffs make this a must listen.
(10/10)

3. Subway to Venus: A great track both instrumentally and vocally, although the instrumentals shine the strongest in this track. Great trumpet and guitar solos in the middle and a nice guitar solo to end the track.
(8/10)

4. Magic Johnson: A tribute to legendary basketball player Magic Johnson, the track is a fast paced and an overall weak song. The only great feature the song offers is the amazing guitar riff from John inbetween verses.
(5/10)

5. Nobody Weird Like Me: The track opens with a fast slap-bassline and progresses into a full headbanger song. The track doesn’t offer until the end wjere it gets very trippy sounding.
(5/10)

6. Knock Me Down: A triumphant tribute to Hillel Slovak, Anthony’s lyrics are strong here and coupled with great instrumentals, this is another can’t miss track.
(9/10)

7. Taste the Pain: One of the best tracks on the record, this track has many vibes. It has some jazz influences and some punk influences as well as some rock influences. The guitar riffs in this track are great and Anthony’s vocals are good as well.
(9/10)

8. Stone Cold Bush: One of the hardest tracks on the record, the great guitar riffs are a great compliment to Flea’s bassline. The groves in the chorus are great and both Flea and John’s solos are perfect.
(8/10)

9. Fire: This Jimi Hendrix cover isn’t as good as the other Stevie Wonder cover track in the album. This version doesn’t bring anything new to the table and is just another track.
(7/10)

10. Pretty Little Ditty: A guitar instrumental track with beautiful guitar riffs from John and great backing instrumentals.
(8/10)

11. Punk Rock Classic: A very short fast paced medley of noise. Its almost to fast to follow the verses, but the chanting chorus and the guitar solo are nice parts of the track. At the end the riff to the Guns n’ Roses song “Sweet Child O Mine” randomly comes in.
(5/10)

12. Sexy Magician Maid: A slow paced and groovey track with nice soft vocals from Anthony. Towards the middle of the song the guitar line gets heavy and a nice solo comes in as well as a suprising saxophone solo.
(6/10)

13. Johnny, Kick a Hole in the Sky: The wailing vocals are funny in the beginning but the track doesn’t realy make up for it. It isn’t a great way to end an album, but the progressive chorus is nice to listen to.
(4/10)

Best:
Higher Ground
Knock Me Down
Taste The Pain

Worst:
Johnny, Kick A Hole in the Sky
Nobody Weird Like Me
Punk Rock Classic

Final LP Rating: 7.0/10
A great album from the Red Hot Chili Peppers and a step forward in their sound as a whole and a step forward with the chemestry between the old band band members and the new impressive and talanted band members, John Frusciante and Chad Smith. Rarely do new cogs in a band work out but the band got lucky and both newbies fit in perfectly with the Red Hot Chili Peppers sound and took it a step further in the right direction.

Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. II

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Upcoming is Part. II of the three-part tribute series for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Part. II of the series covers the Red Hot Chili Peppers breakthrough era from 1989-1995 with platnum and gold albums like Mother’s Milk, the first album with new replacent guitarist John Frusciante and new replacement drummer, Chad Smith, Blood Sugar Sex Magik, the band’s first #1 album (#3 in the US), and finally the under-the radar-album, One Hot Minute, written and recorded with interm, and Jane’s Addiction guitarist, Dave Navarro following the shocking departure of John Frusciante.

Flashback: The Uplift Mofo Party Plan Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. I

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ The Uplift Mofo Party Plan
Released: September 29, 1987
Genre: Funk/Punk/Rock
Label: EMI, Capitol Records
Executive Producer: Michael Beinhorn

The Uplift Mofo Party Plan is the only record released by the Red Hot Chili Peppers that features all original members of the band, Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Hillel Slovak and Jack Irons, since the group’s inception in 1983. This record shows the full potential of the original group of the original four guys who had trouble keeping the group together, but due to the determination of Flea and Anthony to keep the band together, the originals were able to put together a great record. This album was the most successful commercially and critically for the band to that point, and a huge promotional tour followed. To the dismay of the entire band, Hillel Slovak died of a heroin overdose after the tour on June 27, 1988. He had struggled with his addiction during the tour, but failed to admit a problem. The shocking death promted Jack Irons to quit the band saying he was unable to deal with the death. Anthony Kiedis and Flea however knew that more music was bound to be played and decided to keep the train moving.

1. Fight Like A Brave: The first successful single from the Chili Peppers, the track has a heavy and deep bassline coupled with a guitar line that drives the track. Anthony’s raps here were his best so far in his short career.
(9/10)

2. Funky Crime: A grovey track with a heavy bassline. It’s a slow song and it isn’t a great overall track. Although the spoken word sounds good in some places.
(5/10)

3. Me & My Friends: This song is one of the most popular on the record. The track has some nice guitar riffs from Hillel and a driving bassline. The raps are good here and the chorus is a chant of the title. The sliding instrumental sounds halfway through the track are just bliss.
(7/10)

4. Backwoods: Flea’s heavy slap-bassline again drives the track. The guitar lines sound so good in this track. I really like the poetic spoken-word verse at the end.
(7/10)

5. Skinny Sweaty Man: A very short, drum heavy track with fast raps and a odd-sounding chorus. This is pretty much a skip.
(2/10)

6. Behind the Sun: One of the best tracks on the record ironically sounds nothing like any of the others. With a melodic guitar melody and a feel good vibe, this track is definately a must listen on this record.
(8/10)

7. Subterranean Homesick Blues: The lone cover track on the record, this is a nice cover of the Bob Dylan track, putting a funky spin on it.
(5/10)

8. Special Secret Song Inside (Party On Your Pussy): A track with a nice grovey vibe and guitar riff. The track was slated to be named “Party On Your Pussy” but due to label issues was renamed.
(5/10)

9. No Chump Love Sucker: A fast paced track with descending chordal progressions. The chorus is also just a chant of the title. It isn’t a very bad track but it’s something to be in the mood for.
(4/10)

10. Walking Down The Road: A track with a melodic guitar riff and a slap-bassline. There is a triumphant vibe to this track and is a nice listen.
(6/10)

11. Love Trilogy: A slow-paced track to start out, but builds into a slap-bass-heavy track featuring various tempo changes.
(4/10)

12. Organic Anti-Beat Box Band: The final track of the record sends the band off on a odd but funky note. Another track with a heavy slap-bass and a chanting chorus.
(5/10)

Best:
Fight Like A Brave
Behind The Sun
Backwoods

Worst:
Skinny Sweaty Man
Love Trilogy
No Chump Love Sucker

Final LP Rating: 6.0/10

The first and last studio session with the original four band members in their entirety produced an overall solid album but also the first album with a highly successful single, “Fight Like A Brave”. The album as a whole lacked depth but the good songs that came out of the album shined, while the weaker tracks fade into the backround.

Flashback: Freaky Styley Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. I

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Freaky Styley
Released: August 16, 1985
Genre: Funk/Punk/Rock
Label: EMI
Executive Producer: George Clinton

Freaky Styley was the first studio album to feature original guitarist, Hillel Slovak. He rejoined the band after a brief stint where he played for his other, unsuccesful band, What Is This?, along with original drummer Jack Irons, who didnt return to the Red Hot Chili Peppers until the recording sessions of the next studio album, The Uplift Mofo Party Plan. In Iron’s place drummer Cliff Martinez, formally of punk band The Weirdos, was hired during the eponymous debut album sessions to play drums. The sophmore effort from the Red Hot Chili Peppers topped their debut album by a longshot and finally achieved the raw funk sound they had been searching for. This was achieved in part by the influence of producer of the album and member of Parliament-Funkadelic, George Clinton. He provided the necessary influence for the Chili Peppers’ raw sound to shine in the funk vibe.

1. Jungle Man: A really great intrumental intro, but it goes downhill from there. The chorus isnt all that great and the raps in the verses are hard to hear.
(5/10)

2. Hollywood (Africa): A cover track originally by The Meters. The guitar riff is great and the jazz-type feel is nice. The raps again however are hard to make out and the overall track goes nowhere.
(4/10)

3. American Ghost Dance: A slower, funky track with an amazing riff in the chorus and jazz sounding instrumentals in the verses.
(6/10)

4. If You Want Me to Stay: A Sly and the Family Stone cover of their well known track. I like this version, the falseto vocals are a nice touch. Overall a great cover.
(8/10)

5. Nevermind: A fast paced track with a nice slap-bass and great guitar riff. This whole track makes you want to jump up and scream. Underrated song on the record.
(7/10)

6. Freaky Styley: Originally intended to be an intro track, the song was too good to be an intro, so it was made into a solid, grovey track with a nice bassline. The only vocals are chants, but this track was intended to be instrumental.
(8/10)

7. Blackeyed Blonde: A fast paced, guitar-heavy track with some nice grooves. The odd sounding monkey noises just take away from the song.
(5/10)

8. The Brothers Cup: A song with a great guitar riff from Hillel and some nice instrumental grooves.
(7/10)

9. Battleship: Another fast-paced track, but this track is a little more drum-heavy and a weaker track.
(4/10)

10. Lovin’ and Touchin’: A slow, soft track which only lasts 36 seconds.
(2/2)

11. Catholic School Girls Rule: Arguably the best track on the record, this is another fast track with good raps and another amazing guitar riff although, it is an under-two-minute track.
(7/10)

12. Sex Rap: A really great overall track and it could be a lot better if it was longer. The rap from Anthony is probably the best on the record.
(7/10)

13. Thirty Dirty Birds: Another skit-type track which is simply Anthony reciting a short poem.
(2/2)

14. Yertle the Turtle: One of the best tracks on the record, a great funky guitar riff from Hillel and a great lyrical and vocal rap from Anthony. The jazz band in the track gives a nice vibe to to the track and completes the sound
(8/10)

Best:
Yertle the Turtle
Catholic School Girls Rule
If You Want Me To Stay

Worst:
Hollywood (Africa)
Battleship
Blackeyed Blonde

Final LP Rating: 6.5/10

A great improvement in the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ sound from their debut effort and probably the best funk album they recorded, as the Red Hot Chili Peppers sound evolves and changes over time from their early funk-punk sound to hard-rock and ultimately to alternative/hard rock.

Flashback: The Red Hot Chili Peppers (1984) Review: Red Hot Chili Peppers Tribute Series Part. I

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Red Hot Chili Peppers’ The Red Hot Chili Peppers
Released: August 10, 1984
Genre: Funk/Punk/Rock
Label: EMI
Executive Producer: Andy Gill

The debut album from the funky Red Hot Chili Peppers wasn’t one for the record books but it was a start for the iconic band. The album mostly was previously written by original guitarist Hillel Slovak but due to Slovak’s commitment to another band, What Is This?, with mutual original bandmember and drummer Jack Irons, the Red Hot Chili Peppers had to find temporary replacements to record the album. The band settled with Jack Sherman on guitar and Cliff Martinez on drums, both whom were eventually fired. The album had little to no commercial success, but the band was in the middle of finding an identity and at the time were still a popular live band but not known for being good songwriters. That would soon chamge in the future.

1. True Men Don’t Kill Coyotes: A very western sounding funk track with a heavy bassline. Now and again the guitar riffs will come in and sounds good. The raps from Anthony sound like a punked out cowboy. And not in a good way.
(5/10)

2. Baby Appeal: A grovey track with a series of eerie guitar riffs and a slow rap from Anthony.
(5/10)

3. Buckle Down: A track with a simple 3-note bassline and faint guitar riffs but they work. The raps from Anthony are simple and complement the instrumentals.
(7/10)

4. Get Up & Jump: One of the most famous tracks on the record. A fast paced track with a hard moving bassline and some of the best raps on the record.
(7/10)

5. Why Don’t You Love Me: The track starts out promising with a nice guitar riff but when the vocals and remaining instrumentals came in it goes downhill.
(4/10)

6. Green Heaven: A slow, monotone and somewhat boring track with nice guitar riffs and groves. The raps are a little slow but they fit the song well.
(4/10)

7. Mommy Where’s Daddy: A faint slap bass line from flea and a 1-note guitar riff from Jack make the track boring and lyrically dry.
(3/10)

8. Out In L.A.: The standout track on the album. Supossedly this was the first song the Red Hot Chili Peppers wrote. It’s a little short but is has a great vibe and a headbanger.
(8/10)

9. Police Helicopter: This track has a great heavy guitar riff, but te raps aren’t good and the track is way too short.
(4/10)

10. You Always Sing The Same: A pointless 15 second rap of the title over and over.
(1/10)

11. Grand Pappy Du Plenty: An instrumental track which opens with an eerie guitar riff and faint drums.
(6/10)

Best:
Out In L.A.
Get Up & Jump
Buckle Down

Worst:
You Always Sing the Same
Why Don’t You Love Me
Mommy Where’s Daddy

Final LP Rating: 4.5/10
The songs in the record for the most part weren’t good, but the album was a first in a learning process for the future successful band.